HOW TO CLEAN GARDEN TOOLS - CLEAN GARDEN TOOLS


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How To Clean Garden Tools





how to clean garden tools






    garden tools
  • (garden tool) used for working in gardens or yards

  • A garden tool is any one of many tools made for gardens and gardening and overlaps with the range of tools made for agriculture and horticulture. Garden tools can also be hand tools and power tools.





    how to
  • Providing detailed and practical advice

  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.

  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic

  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations





    clean
  • Remove the innards of (fish or poultry) prior to cooking

  • make clean by removing dirt, filth, or unwanted substances from; "Clean the stove!"; "The dentist cleaned my teeth"

  • free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits; "children with clean shining faces"; "clean white shirts"; "clean dishes"; "a spotlessly clean house"; "cats are clean animals"

  • clean and jerk: a weightlift in which the barbell is lifted to shoulder height and then jerked overhead

  • Make (something or someone) free of dirt, marks, or mess, esp. by washing, wiping, or brushing











how to clean garden tools - Fiskars 9405




Fiskars 9405 Kangaroo 30-Gallon Gardening Container


Fiskars 9405 Kangaroo 30-Gallon Gardening Container



Whether you’re cleaning up pulled weeds or grass clippings, picking up toys or gathering laundry from your clothesline, our Kangaroo Gardening Container makes it easy. An innovative design folds to 3" for space-saving storage, and an internal spring pops it up when you’re ready to use it. Sturdy handles make carrying and unloading our Kangaroo Gardening Container easy, and a durable, tear- and mildew-resistant design provides lasting value.

Perfect for pruning or weeding jobs, the Fiskars Kangaroo 30-gallon gardening container holds itself open, freeing your hands for work. The Kangaroo's unique spring design springs up to a 22-inch diameter, 30-gallon capacity, just waiting to be filled with weeds, pruned branches, or raked leaves. When you're done, the container can be collapsed and stored easily in a compact, ready-to-hang 3-inch stack. The heavy-gauge vinyl construction is tear and mildew resistant, and the Kangaroo fits standard 30-gallon garbage can liners. The container weighs just 4-1/2 pounds. It is covered by a 2-year warranty.










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A rare find... the glorious colors of the almost extinct Atala butterfly




A rare find... the glorious colors of the almost extinct Atala butterfly





Explore Jan 20, 2011 #254

How lucky am I? Two weeks in a row I have found and managed to capture an image of this rare orange and brilliant blue beauty! Both times I was shaking with excitement! I had been telling Albert about the Atala and shown him its picture. He was the one who said, "What's that? I think I see one!" And the chase began.

The Atala is a strange butterfly to photograph. The colored areas are vague at the margins so the pigment looks like it has been dusted on the wings and body a bit carelessly. But look at its marvelous tones... deep velvety blue, bright electric blue and brilliant red orange! It is fast moving so getting a shot at all is a thrill! Usually looks like a vibrant patch of astounding flying color and it's gone'. The Atala is also unique in that its bright colors are on the underside of the wings not the top, qnd it keeps its wings closed and upright as soon as it lands. The topside of the Atala's wings is quite plain and darkr. No big, brilliant open-wing shots like you can take of a Monarch!

Interdependencies in nature once again. This marvelous creature owes its life to the Florida Coontie which was almost wiped out after being the money crop of the first Florida pioneers. Without the Coontie, this beauty will be gone.

The short, woody stem and rootstock of the Coontie grows almost completely underground and produces a terminal crown of stiff, evergreen, pinnate leaves up to 3 feet long. The brown, fleshy, erect, female or seed-bearing cones are pendent when mature. Coontie plants contain a natural toxin, which atala larvae accumulate in their bodies and use to repel birds. Without coontie, adult atalas have no place to lay eggs. No eggs means no new generations. .

Wild coonties’ demise began with starch: Long before Europeans arrived in Florida, Native Americans used coontie as a source of starch. Coontie, in fact, is a Seminole word that means “bread” or “white root” because the roots can be made into flour.

From "The Forgotten Frontier: Florida Through the Lens of Ralph Middleton Munroe" by Arva Moore Parks: 'Behind the hammock land the pine and palmetto country seemed to go on forever. Sending roots into the crevices of stone, the tall pine and its companions, the bushy palmetto and the fernlike comptie (Zamia), thrived in what seemed like solid rock. Althought not as glamorous as the hammock, the pineland was the backbone of the land. The heart of the pine became the foundation of the pioneer home; the palmetto, for thatch, became the roof; and the starch made from the root of the comptie filled the pionerer's stomach."

Cootie is sporadic in pinelands and hammocks throughout nearly all peninsular Florida and the Keys. In an effort to preserve the Atala, the coontie is being used increasingly in landscaping. Here in Miami, it is growing at Arch Creek East Environmental Preserve. Arch Creek was an early Tequesta Indian settlement here in North Miami. Arch Creek is spanned by a natural limestone bridge. Early photographs of Miami show the bridge in all its beauty. Compromised now by encroaching housing and roadways.

The Tequesta Indians thrived in Arch Creek and the surrounding area. There was an oak hammock near the creek which provided shade as well as edible plants, nuts and berries. Biscayne Bay, less than a half mile away, was a prime food source for the Tequestas. There they caught shellfish, shark, manatee and turtle. North of the hammock were pine flatlands, which sheltered the all-important coontie plant (Zamia integrifolia), whose roots the Indians ground to make an edible starch product.

Tequesta habitation sites characteristically have midden areas or Indian garbage dumps. The gradual decomposition of refuse, including plant material and animal bones, produces a rich black soil. Many artifacts have been preserved in the soil, and archaeologists have uncovered many of them, such as bone points, shell tools and pottery shards. During their centuries of occupation (from c. 400 A.D. to c. 1200 A.D.), the Arch Creek Tequestas had what appears to be a fairly comfortable lifestyle, supported by the abundant natural resources at the site.

Around 1858 two ambitious pioneers used the creek and its natural bridge as a site for a coontie starch mill. These early entrepreneurs learned how to clean the poisonous roots and dammed up the waterway under the bridge diverting the flow through a sluice they carved out of a solid limestone bank. The water turned a wooden wheel attached to a nail-studded grinder, which mashed the cootie roots into a paste-like pulp. The resulting starch was then soaked and strained to remove any remaining poison. Laid out in wooden racks, the starch dried quickly and the sun bleached it white. In the early 1900s, several commercial factories in South Florida processed coontie roots for the manufacture of arrowroot biscuits. But coontie starch was not as successful as the pioneers thought, and the mill was ab











Atala pupae... one has opened and one more to go!




Atala pupae... one has opened and one more to go!





On the left, the orange brown cocoon is about to hatch. The little dark clump to the right is the remains of a cocoon that has already opened! The Atalas laid their eggs on the Coontie plants to the left of this Moujean Tea plant. Once out of the cocoon they have flown to nectar and strenthen their wings on this plant. It is rare to catch a shot of an Atala so I was fortunate to be at Fairchild this morning and to know where to look!

The Atala butterfly owes its life to the Florida Coontie which was almost wiped out after being the money crop of the first Florida pioneers. Without the Coontie, this beauty will be gone. This is the only plant they lay their eggs on.

The short, woody stem and rootstock of the Coontie grows almost completely underground and produces a terminal crown of stiff, evergreen, pinnate leaves up to 3 feet long. The brown, fleshy, erect, female or seed-bearing cones are pendent when mature. Coontie plants contain a natural toxin, which Atala larvae accumulate in their bodies and use to repel birds. Without Coontie, adult Atalas have no place to lay eggs. No eggs means no new generations. .

Wild Coonties’ demise began with starch: Long before Europeans arrived in Florida, Native Americans used Coontie as a source of starch. Coontie, in fact, is a Seminole word that means “bread” or “white root” because the roots can be made into flour.

From "The Forgotten Frontier: Florida Through the Lens of Ralph Middleton Munroe" by Arva Moore Parks: 'Behind the hammock land the pine and palmetto country seemed to go on forever. Sending roots into the crevices of stone, the tall pine and its companions, the bushy palmetto and the fernlike comptie (Zamia), thrived in what seemed like solid rock. Althought not as glamorous as the hammock, the pineland was the backbone of the land. The heart of the pine became the foundation of the pioneer home; the palmetto, for thatch, became the roof; and the starch made from the root of the comptie filled the pionerer's stomach."

Cootie is sporadic in pinelands and hammocks throughout nearly all peninsular Florida and the Keys. In an effort to preserve the Atala, the Coontie is being used increasingly in landscaping. Here in Miami, it is growing at Arch Creek East Environmental Preserve.

Arch Creek was an early Tequesta Indian settlement here in North Miami. Arch Creek is spanned by a natural limestone bridge. Early photographs of Miami show the bridge in all its beauty. Compromised now by encroaching housing and roadways.

The Tequesta Indians thrived in Arch Creek and the surrounding area. There was an oak hammock near the creek which provided shade as well as edible plants, nuts and berries. Biscayne Bay, less than a half mile away, was a prime food source for the Tequestas. There they caught shellfish, shark, manatee and turtle. North of the hammock were pine flatlands, which sheltered the all-important Coontie plant (Zamia integrifolia), whose roots the Indians ground to make an edible starch product.

Tequesta habitation sites characteristically have midden areas or Indian garbage dumps. The gradual decomposition of refuse, including plant material and animal bones, produces a rich black soil. Many artifacts have been preserved in the soil, and archaeologists have uncovered many of them, such as bone points, shell tools and pottery shards. During their centuries of occupation (from c. 400 A.D. to c. 1200 A.D.), the Arch Creek Tequestas had what appears to be a fairly comfortable lifestyle, supported by the abundant natural resources at the site.

Around 1858 two ambitious pioneers used the creek and its natural bridge as a site for a Coontie starch mill. These early entrepreneurs learned how to clean the poisonous roots and dammed up the waterway under the bridge diverting the flow through a sluice they carved out of a solid limestone bank. The water turned a wooden wheel attached to a nail-studded grinder, which mashed the cootie roots into a paste-like pulp. The resulting starch was then soaked and strained to remove any remaining poison. Laid out in wooden racks, the starch dried quickly and the sun bleached it white. In the early 1900s, several commercial factories in South Florida processed Coontie roots for the manufacture of arrowroot biscuits. But Coontie starch was not as successful as the pioneers thought, and the mill was abandoned several years later. The water sluice was filled in and paved over and was not rediscovered until archaeologists excavated it in 1972.

Atala Eumaeus
Moujean Tea, Nashia inaquensis
Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Miami, FL









how to clean garden tools








how to clean garden tools




Picnic Time 5 Piece Garden Tool Set With Tote And Folding Seat 542-93-121






Gardening just got easier with the Gardener by Picnic Time! The Gardener is a folding seat and detachable polyester storage tote all-in-one. The storage tote has two zippered openings, one on the backside and one on the top for easy access from any angle and it conveniently holds 5 metal garden tools on the exterior of the tote so they are readily accessible when you need them. All 5 tools have wooden handles and leatherette straps for hanging. Makes a perfect gift for those who love spending time in their garden.










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